Purpose

Asthma imposes a significant burden in the US in terms of morbidity, costs to society, individual suffering, loss of productivity and mortality. African Americans (AA) and Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) bear a disproportionate share of that morbidity. Despite national guidelines for asthma treatment, the gap between these groups and whites has been stable or widening. The need for pragmatic research to address the continuing burden is widely recognized. Patients use asthma reliever inhalers to provide immediate relief of symptoms. Controller inhalers (inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)) are intended to be used regularly to prevent symptoms and attacks. Guidelines suggest that they be used daily, on a fixed basis, in all but the mildest asthma. However, adherence by patients and implementation of evidence-based guideline recommendations by clinicians has been poor. Gap analysis suggests that it is difficult to improve adherence to the current recommendations without complex and resource-intensive interventions. Studies have examined symptom-activated use of ICS triggered by use of a reliever medication. The Investigators call this approach PARTICS - Patient Activated Reliever-Triggered Inhaled CorticoSteroid. Explanatory, non-real world studies suggest that PARTICS can produce up to 50% reductions in asthma attacks compared with usual care, while reducing ICS use by half or more. These studies have been performed in pre-selected populations, which represent less than 5% of asthma patients. The previous studies have been done with repeated education and adherence checks in both the intervention and control arms. The investigators have consulted with AA and H/L patients, health care providers, leaders of professional societies, advocacy groups, health policy leaders, pharmacists, and pharmaceutical manufacturers. All groups have indicated that asthma decision making would be changed if we demonstrated that implementing PARTICS improves important asthma outcomes such as reducing exacerbations. The Investigators have designed a study with the stakeholders to determine whether PARTICS can improve outcomes that are important to patients when superimposed on a background provider-educated standard of care through the Asthma IQ system. The Investigators propose a study entitled PREPARE: Patient Empowered Strategy to Reduce Asthma Morbidity in Highly Impacted Populations. The Investigators aim to determine whether PARTICS can reduce asthma morbidity in AA and H/L.

Condition

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 18 Years and 75 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
No

Inclusion Criteria

  • Black or Hispanic based on self-identification (Hispanic if identify as both)
  • Male and female, ages 18-75 years
  • Ability to provide informed consent
  • Clinical history consistent with asthma for > 1 year.
  • Prescribed ICS as daily maintenance therapy
  • Participant must also have an ACT score of 19 or less, or a history of one or more exacerbations in the past year that required patient report of systemic corticosteroid use.

Exclusion Criteria

  • Life expectancy less than one year
  • Known allergy to the ICS inhaler used in the study
  • Having COPD or other chronic lung disease other than asthma; with the exception of the following:
  • Dx of COPD in a never smoker without any other lung disease or any other disease that might cause airway obstruction such as: Cystic Fibrosis, Connective Tissue Disease, premature birth, organ transplantation, bronchiectasis, sarcoid, and obliterative bronchiolitis
  • Dx of COPD in former smoker with normal PFTs done after the person quit smoking
  • Dx of COPD in current smoker with normal PFTs done in past 24 months
  • Dx of COPD IN CURRENT OR FORMER SMOKER with obstruction on PFTs: normal diffusing capacity in past 24 months and demonstrated reversibility of 12% or more at any time
  • Regular systemic corticosteroid use daily or every other day for any reason—including asthma or other medical reasons
  • Use of systemic corticosteroid, or visit to the doctor's office, emergency department (ED) or urgent care, or overnight hospitalization for an asthma exacerbation in the past month (can wait and re-check eligibility after one month)
  • Use of biologics (injections or infusion medicines): with the exception of the following:
  • the patient has been on a stable dose of a biologic for at least 6 months and,
  • must have had an exacerbation at least 2 months after starting on a biologic to be considered eligible OR
  • must have a current ACT score <=19 to be considered eligible.
  • Bronchial thermoplasty less than 6 months ago (can re-check eligibility 6 months after procedure)
  • Another family member living in the same household already enrolled in study

Study Design

Phase
Phase 4
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Randomized
Intervention Model
Parallel Assignment
Primary Purpose
Health Services Research
Masking
Single (Outcomes Assessor)

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Active Comparator
PARTICS
addition of PARTICS strategy - Patient Activated Reliever-Triggered Inhaled CorticoSteroid (PARTICS) using QVAR . Patient will use inhaled corticosteroid at time of rescue inhaler use
  • Drug: PARTICS using QVAR
    Patient takes inhaled corticosteroid at the time of rescue inhaler use
    Other names:
    • Patient Activated Reliever-Triggered Inhaled CorticoSteroid
No Intervention
Usual Care
Provider-enhanced usual care arm; no change in asthma management

Recruiting Locations

More Details

NCT ID
NCT02995733
Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Study Contact

Nancy Maher, MPH
857-307-3892
NMAHER@BWH.HARVARD.EDU

Detailed Description

Asthma imposes a significant burden on the US population in terms of morbidity, costs to society, individual suffering, loss of productivity and mortality. African Americans (AA) and Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) bear a disproportionate share of that morbidity. Despite introduction of national guidelines for asthma treatment, the gap between these groups and whites has been stable or widening. The need for pragmatic research to address the continuing burden is widely recognized. Patients use asthma reliever inhalers to provide immediate relief of symptoms. Controller inhalers (inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)) are intended to be used regularly to prevent symptoms and attacks. Guidelines suggest that they be used daily, on a fixed basis, in all but the mildest asthma. However, adherence by patients and implementation of evidence-based guideline recommendations by clinicians has been poor. Gap analysis suggests that it is difficult to improve adherence to the current recommendations without complex and resource-intensive interventions.

Studies have examined symptom-activated use of ICS triggered by use of a reliever medication. We call this approach PARTICS - Patient Activated Reliever-Triggered Inhaled CorticoSteroid. Explanatory, non-real world studies suggest that PARTICS can produce up to 50% reductions in asthma attacks compared with usual care, while reducing ICS use by half or more. However, these studies have been performed in pre- selected populations, which represent less than 5% of patients with asthma. They have been done with repeated education and adherence checks in both the intervention and control arms.

The investigators have consulted with AA and H/L patients, health care providers, leaders of professional societies, advocacy groups, health policy leaders, pharmacists, and pharmaceutical manufacturers. All groups have indicated that asthma decision making would be changed if it was demonstrated that implementing PARTICS improves important asthma outcomes such as reducing rates of exacerbations. Together with our partners and stakeholders, the investigators have designed a study to determine whether PARTICS can improve outcomes that are important to patients when superimposed on a background provider-educated standard care through the Asthma IQ system. The investigators therefore propose a study entitled PREPARE: Patient Empowered Strategy to Reduce Asthma Morbidity in Highly Impacted Populations. The aim is to determine whether a PARTICS strategy can reduce asthma morbidity in AA and H/L. The primary outcome will be asthma exacerbations which have been shown to be important to patient and healthcare stakeholders. The secondary outcomes will include additional outcomes important to patients (i.e. days lost from work or school, asthma control, & asthma quality of life). The investigators have broad input and involvement from multiple stakeholder groups in study design, implementation, and commitments for dissemination. AA and H/L patients and their advocates have been involved and will continue to play a central role in all phases of the study.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.